United States
Print page content Print
Increase text size Decrease text size
Text Size
Vanguard CIV H3N2/H3N8 Logo

ABOUT CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

CIV H3N8 was already an emerging concern within the veterinary community when the highly contagious CIV type H3N2 was identified in the U.S. in March 2015 and quickly spread across more than 30 states.1,2 In response to this outbreak, Zoetis was the first to offer a vaccine to protect dogs against H3N2.

CIV is highly contagious and can be difficult to diagnose and potentially difficult to treat. Prevention against both types of CIV remains the best course of action to reduce the risk of outbreaks and develop herd immunity within your community.

Diagnosis

A number of diagnostic challenges and containment requirements underline the advantages of vaccination:

  • Clinical signs sometimes don’t emerge until after the majority of virus shedding has occurred.
  • Samples collected during clinical exams may not identify CIV.3
  • All dogs can be at risk of contracting dog flu.2
  • CIV is associated with Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD).
  • In some cases, symptoms can be severe, including moderate nasal discharge, coughing, sneezing, depression, retching, labored breathing and fever (>39.5 C).
  • Dogs infected with CIV H3N2 may require an extended isolation period.4

Risk Implications for Clinics

Regardless of quality of care, outbreaks of CIV can lead to severe consequences for practices:

  • Damage to the hospital's reputation.
  • Need for suspension of services such as boarding, daycare and grooming.
  • Intensive decontamination protocols.
  • Diversion of healthy patients to other practices.