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Be Sure You Have The Right Strategy

Work with your herd's veterinarian to find the best vaccination strategy for your operation.

  • Producing the negative weaned pig — Start addressing influenza at the top of the production system. Pre-wean pigs have been shown to harbor IAV-S and can carry it to the nursery after weaning.1
  • Whole breeding herd vaccination — If animals continue to be chronically infected, this strategy helps shut down continuous viral shedding.2
  • Pre-farrow vaccination — This strategy can help protect newborn piglets by increasing influenza maternally derived antibodies (MDA) transferred from the mother after colostrum intake.3
  • Gilt vaccination — Immunizing incoming gilts is critical to maintaining stability in the sow herd.

Producing The Negative Weaned Pig

While pigs of all ages can be infected by IAV-S, weaning-age pigs are an important subpopulation for infection.1

Pre-farrowing vaccination is a studied strategy that:

  • Helps protect suckling and growing pigs from IAV-S.2
  • Induces maternal antibodies in piglets, helping provide them with early immunity.2
  • Pre-wean pigs have been shown to harbor IAV-S and can carry it to the nursery after weaning.4
  • In a 2,000-sow farrow-to-wean farm, up to 63% of pigs* were infected with IAV-S at weaning even though there was no detectable disease in breeding-age pigs.5
  • IAV-S mantained longer than expected in growing pig populations, for up to 70 days in a finisher pig population.4

*Aged 11 days and older

Growth chart

Whole Breeding Herd Vaccination

Whole herd or mass vaccination is a common strategy on many U.S. farms, along with pre-farrow and pre-breeding vaccination.2

A whole breeding herd vaccination strategy with FluSure XP®:

  • Might be the best strategy if animals continue to be chronically infected — it helps shut down continuous viral shedding2
  • Should be administered as a two-dose blanket vaccination with semiannual revaccinations after the initial two doses2
  • Must be accompanied by biosecurity control and isolation measures, as well as strategic gilt immunization and entry procedures2

See the results two swine operations had using this vaccination strategy.

Pre-Farrow Vaccination

Vaccines can help protect newborn piglets by increasing influenza maternally derived antibodies (MDA) transferred from the mother after colostrum intake.3

  • Higher antibody titers were found in piglets born to sows vaccinated before farrowing compared with those of unvaccinated sows.2
  • MDA can protect the piglet for eight to 10 weeks after birth.2

A pre-farrow vaccination strategy with FluSure XP:

  • Helps decrease viral shedding at farrowing2
  • Induces piglet maternal antibodies, helping strengthen early immunity2
  • Should be administered as a single dose (as a booster in previously vaccinated animals) two to four weeks pre-farrowing2
  • Helps provide higher levels of maternal antibodies when administered as a two-dose regimen2

Gilt Vaccination

Failure to properly vaccinate gilts can lead to ongoing circulation of influenza in the sow herd.

A gilt vaccination strategy with FluSure XP:

  1. Includes two doses of FluSure XP beginning at age 11 to 14 weeks
  2. Shots triggered three weeks apart
  3. Can be administered prior to breeding with FluSure XP/FarrowSure® GOLD or
    FluSure XP/FarrowSure GOLD B
  4. Can be administered in combination with RespiSure®, RespiSure-ONE® or
    ER Bac® Plus as part of complete gilt immunization protocol
Vaccine info

  1. Allerson M, Torremorell M. Influenza virus prevalence and risk factors in weaning-age pigs, in Proceedings. Allen D. Leman Swine Conf 2013;40-97.
  2. Corzo CA, Gramer M, Kuhn M, Mohr M, Morrison R. Observations regarding influenza A virus shedding in a swine breeding farm after mass vaccination. J Swine Health Prod. 2012;20(6):283-289.
  3. Allerson M, Deen J, Detmer SE et al. The impact of maternally derived immunity on influenza A virus transmission in neonatal pig populations. Vaccine. 2013;31(3):500-505.Allerson M, Torremorell M. The epidemiology of influenza virus in sow farms: A case report, in Proceedings. Allen D. Leman Swine Conf 2010;172.
  4. Torremorell M. What should we do about flu?, in Proceedings. Allen D. Leman Swine Conf 2011;27-32.
  5. Allerson M, Torremorell M. The epidemiology of influenza virus in sow farms: A case report, in Proceedings. Allen D. Leman Swine Conf 2010;172.